Increase text size Decrease text size

Foot & Glove prints to be Immortalized by J3

Posted on: 5th January 2012

The Estate of Michael Jackson announced today that Michael will be immortalized in a hand and foot print ceremony at Hollywood’s legendary Grauman’s Chinese Theatre on January 26, 2012, starting at 11:00am PST.

In a giant celebration of the legacy of the King of Pop, and the Los Angeles debut of Michael Jackson THE IMMORTAL World Tour, Michael Jackson’s three children, Prince, Paris and “Blanket” will use their father’s shoes and sequined glove to make impressions in the cement in the famous forecourt of the theatre (alongside such entertainment icons as Fred Astaire, Elizabeth Taylor, Judy Garland, Marilyn Monroe, Sidney Poitier, Clark Gable, Mary Pickford, and Douglas Fairbanks).

The cast of THE IMMORTAL World Tour will perform a special live presentation, and the entire event will be streamed live via Twitter @michaeljackson with additional photos and live coverage of the event tweeted from Twitter’s music channel @twittermusic.

Fans can go to findeventdetails.com/mjlegacyon January 19 for line up information!!

Source: MJ Team Online

MJ Estate releases statement re Murray Sentencing

Posted on: 30th November 2011

Michael Jackson’s death was a huge loss to his children, his family, and his fans worldwide. A jury determinied Michael’s untimely passing was caused by Conrad Murray. Dr. Murray in pre-trial statements and in a post-trial documentary expressed no remorse or responsibility for Mr. Jackson’s death. The Estate of Michael Jackson believes that the sentence imposed on Conrad Murray by Judge Pastor was appropriate and called for. The egregious conduct of Dr. Murray when “treating” Michael Jackson was bad enough but when coupled with his outrageous lies in trying to cover up his wrongdoing after Michael was dying and/or had died only served to magnify his criminal actions. Michael Jackson was the one of the greatest entertainers that ever lived and he will be missed by millions.

IMMORTAL Album Preview

Posted on: 22nd November 2011

We’re another day closer to the release of IMMORTAL! And to continue the celebration, another sneak peek! Take a listen to “This Place Hotel/Smooth Criminal/Dangerous” and get ready for the release of IMMORTAL on Nov. 21!

http://bit.ly/vswOf9

Ready to dance? Listen to today’s second song off of IMMORTAL, “Dancing Machine/Blame it on the Boogie” and let us know what you think!

http://bit.ly/suic1f

You’ve never heard “I’ll Be There” like this before – nothing but Michael’s vocals and a piano played by Greg Phillinganes, musical director for Michael Jackson THE IMMORTAL World Tour. Just one of the tracks on the upcoming album IMMORTAL.

http://bit.ly/rCcj6j

CityVille Goes MJ!

Posted on: 22nd November 2011

Michael Jackson fans who are also CityVille players are in for a treat! Swing by CityVille starting this week, where players will be able get closer to the King of Pop with a visit from Michael Jackson THE IMMORTAL World Tour!! Players over level six can celebrate from now until November 25th, as Michael Jackson THE IMMORTAL World Tour makes a stop in Cityville. Complete your quest and unlock an exclusive video from the show, and for the first time, players and fans who choose to purchase the IMMORTAL album or tickets to Michael Jackson THE IMMORTAL World Tour in Las Vegas will also get a special limited edition virtual good for their city – only available as part of this celebration!!

Jackson Doctor’s Defense Looms In Trial’s 4th week

Posted on: 21st October 2011

The trial of Michael Jackson’s personal physician will enter a new phase this week, with the doctor’s attorneys trying to counter three weeks of damaging testimony and attempting to show that the singer somehow caused his own death.

Lawyers for Dr. Conrad Murray have told jurors that the involuntary manslaughter case will hinge on the science of what killed Jackson in June 2009. They will call their own experts to counter prosecution witnesses who have repeatedly told the panel that Murray was reckless and beyond the fringes of medicine when he administered the anesthetic propofol to help Jackson sleep.

The Houston-based cardiologist has pleaded not guilty and his attorneys continue to maintain that Jackson somehow gave himself the fatal dose of medication. They have abandoned the theory that Jackson died after swallowing propofol, but now contend he was killed after taking several pills of the sedative lorazepam and possibly giving himself a shot of propofol after Murray left the singer’s bedroom.

Before the defense lays out its case — expected to consist of 15 witnesses and last until the end of the month — it will have to contend with the government’s final witness, Dr. Steven Shafer. The Columbia researcher and professor helped write the warnings and directions included with every vial of propofol — warnings a prosecutor said in opening statements that Murray ignored.

Defense attorney Nareg Gourjian declined to say Friday who Murray’s team would call to testify, but told the judge they would include police officers, experts and some character witnesses. He was not asked, nor did he mention, whether Murray would testify in his own defense.

It seems unlikely that Murray will testify. Jurors have already heard his more-than-two-hour interview in which he laid out his version of events before Jackson’s death to a detective who acknowledges he wasn’t conducting an interrogation.

If Murray takes the stand, he would undoubtedly be asked by prosecutors about several unanswered questions, such as why he never told paramedics or ER doctors about giving Jackson propofol, why he never told police he was on the phone for long stretches of the morning Jackson died, and why he recorded the singer when he was impaired, stumbling his way through his plans for a children’s hospital and cementing a legacy larger than those attained by Elvis Presley or The Beatles.

In his opening statement to jurors, lead defense attorney Ed Chernoff said Murray’s team would try to answer two fundamental questions:

“First, how did Michael Jackson get to this point, this desperate point,”

Chernoff said.

“And second, what happened when Dr. Murray was out of the room?”

Prosecution witnesses have acknowledged that only Jackson and Murray know what really happened, but two medical experts testified last week that Murray was grossly negligent. Even if Jackson somehow was able to give himself medication after Murray left the room, the doctor should have been closely monitoring the singer and should have never left any medications within arms’ reach, the doctors said.

Ellyn Garofalo, who last year won an acquittal for one of Anna Nicole Smith’s doctors charged with improperly prescribing pain medications, said Murray’s team should focus on their expert testimony and not start calling character witnesses.

“If they start to call character witnesses, they don’t have a great deal of faith in their defense,”

she said.

She said the experts should be able to show that the case isn’t as simple as prosecutors have claimed, and that it is filled with “all kinds of shades of gray.”

Murray’s attorneys should also try to argue that prosecutors should not be second-guessing medical decisions. “Do we really want the DA’s office making medical decisions for doctors,” she asked.

Murray’s case, she noted, differs in one major respect from the case against her client, who was never accused of causing Smith’s death.

Garofalo said Murray’s case will be harder to win, and prosecutors so far have done a solid job of showing that the doctor shouldn’t have been giving Jackson propofol as a sleep aid in the superstar’s bedroom.

“It’s a strong case because you have somebody dead after somebody did something that is unheard of,”

Garofalo said.

Murray’s defense strategy also appears to involve calling hostile witnesses, including police officers who prosecutors did not call during their case. The defense scored some points early in the trial by getting a coroner’s investigator to acknowledge that she moved some evidence around in Jackson’s bedroom before photographing it and that she didn’t keep all her notes. The officers would likely undergo the similar harsh questioning about their decisions.

They may also call doctors who previously treated Jackson but have never been formally accused of wrongdoing. They are barred from calling one doctor whose name has been repeatedly mentioned during the trial — Jackson’s longtime dermatologist Dr. Arnold Klein.

Murray’s team may also call Jackson’s hairdresser, Karen Faye, who they have said will testify that the singer was distraught at the prospect of performing 50 comeback concerts at London’s O2 arena. Such an account would be in contrast with several other witnesses who said Jackson was excited about the concerts and that his three children would see him perform.

Several of Dr Murray’s patients came to his defence, as they testified that he was a caring and competent physician. Many of those who appeared in court were patients at Dr Murray’s Las Vegas clinic, and spoke of his willingness to provide essential care to all his patients, even those who could not cover the costs of his medical bills.

It’s been difficult to avoid seeing details of the Jackson trial over recent months. With Dr Murray pleading not guilty to involuntary manslaughter, the case has continued to be widely reported by the media, and you’re more than likely to catch the latest headlines while checking your emails or playing online games, like Partypoker. One aspect of the case which is often documents online and in newspapers is the fact that Murray has appeared to show little emotion during the trial, even whist prosecutors accused him of being ‘greedy’. However, during the recent the latest hearing, the doctor broke down in tears after hearing the various character witnesses speaking in his defence.

Final witnesses are due to be called tomorrow in the form of medical experts. Although Murray’s patients claimed that the physician never seemed to be motivated by money, prosecutors previously claimed that he has requested a $5million fee to be Jackson’s personal doctor, before agreeing in $150000 a month.

The trial, which is entering its fourth week, has moved rapidly, with 33 witnesses so far and both sides presenting more than 250 pieces of evidence. At its current pace, jurors should receive the case next week.

Paris Jackson Goes Crazy at Chris Brown Concert

Posted on: 21st October 2011

It was feared that a live video link performance by Chris Brown at Michael Jackson’s tribute concert would put a ‘negative slant’ on the day. But at least one member of the Jackson family is a fan of his and she showed her love for the R&B star at his concert last night.

Paris Jackson, the daughter of the late superstar, was snapped in the front row of his Los Angeles concert yesterday, screaming his name and singing and dancing along to his set.

And at one point, she threw her arms in the air and made a heart shape with her hands as she directed her love towards the singer.

She screamed and sang along to Brown’s songs as he gyrated and strutted his stuff on the stage right in front of her, and much to her delight.

Wearing a blue baseball cap with an Egyptian pharaoh print on the front, the smile never left Paris’s face as she soaked up the atmosphere of the concert. Paris and her friend clung on to each other as they screamed at their idol

And she took to her Twitter page to share her delight at being in the audience, firstly Tweeting Brown to say:

‘AMAZING Show Tonight!! You Were Outstanding!!’

She then added:

‘Blew my MIND!!!! i was in the front; it was just like, mind-blowing!!! hahaha!

‘Amazing, mindblowing, outstanding, crazy, like… indescribable lol.’

Paris, 13, was joined by some friends at the gig at the Staples Center in the city – the same venue where her father’s memorial service and concert took place a few weeks after he died.

Brown, 22, was forced to bow out of plans to take part in the event following his highly-publicised bust-up with ex-girlfriend Rihanna.

The incident with Rihanna also meant he was also unable to be part of the line-up of artists performing at a Michael Jackson memorial concert at the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff earlier this month.

He was sentenced to five years’ probation after assaulting his then-girlfriend resulting in him being barred from entering the UK as a result of his criminal conviction.

A suggestion was reportedly made at the time that he could perform via video link, but the idea was alleged to have been vetoed by organisers because they feared it might put a ‘negative slant’ on the day.

A source told the Daily Mirror: ‘The family wants to make sure the show is a fitting tribute to Michael.’

Source: DailyMail.com

Jackson Doctor’s Attorneys Get Chance to Sway Jury, Present Own Theories

Posted on: 16th October 2011

The trial of Michael Jackson’s personal physician will enter a new phase this week, with the doctor’s attorneys trying to counter three weeks of damaging testimony and attempting to show that the singer somehow caused his own death.

Lawyers for Dr. Conrad Murray have told jurors that the involuntary manslaughter case will hinge on the science of what killed Jackson in June 2009. They will call their own experts to counter prosecution witnesses who have repeatedly told the panel that Murray was reckless and beyond the fringes of medicine when he administered the anesthetic propofol to help Jackson sleep.

The Houston-based cardiologist has pleaded not guilty and his attorneys continue to maintain that Jackson somehow gave himself the fatal dose of medication. They have abandoned the theory that Jackson died after swallowing propofol, but now contend he was killed after taking several pills of the sedative lorazepam and possibly giving himself a shot of propofol after Murray left the singer’s bedroom.

Before the defense lays out its case — expected to consist of 15 witnesses and last until the end of the month — it will have to contend with the government’s final witness, Dr. Steven Shafer. The Columbia University researcher and professor helped write the warnings and directions included with every vial of propofol — warnings a prosecutor said in opening statements that Murray ignored.

Defense attorney Nareg Gourjian declined to say Friday who Murray’s team would call to testify, but told the judge they would include police officers, experts and some character witnesses. He was not asked, nor did he mention, whether Murray would testify in his own defense.

It seems unlikely that Murray will testify. Jurors have already heard his more-than-two-hour interview in which he laid out his version of events before Jackson’s death to a detective who acknowledges he wasn’t conducting an interrogation.

If Murray takes the stand, he would undoubtedly be asked by prosecutors about several unanswered questions, such as why he never told paramedics or ER doctors about giving Jackson propofol, why he never told police he was on the phone for long stretches of the morning Jackson died, and why he recorded the singer when he was impaired, stumbling his way through his plans for a children’s hospital and cementing a legacy larger than those attained by Elvis Presley or The Beatles.

In his opening statement to jurors, lead defense attorney Ed Chernoff said Murray’s team would try to answer two fundamental questions:

“First, how did Michael Jackson get to this point, this desperate point,”

Chernoff said.

“And second, what happened when Dr. Murray was out of the room?”

Prosecution witnesses have acknowledged that only Jackson and Murray know what really happened, but two medical experts testified last week that Murray was grossly negligent. Even if Jackson somehow was able to give himself medication after Murray left the room, the doctor should have been closely monitoring the singer and should have never left any medications within arms’ reach, the doctors said.

Source: WashingtonPost.com

Michael Jackson: La Toya Jackson Discusses Tribute to King of Pop

Posted on: 16th October 2011

The tribute to Michael Jackson took place last week in Wales, and many of the Jackson family members attended including Michael Jackson’s three children, his mother, and sister La Toya Jackson. According to a new update made via Twitter, Jackson revealed her thoughts on the tribute, and thanked many of the performers that took part in the event.

La Toya Jackson wrote of the tribute to Michael Jackson:

“It was Great!!! To see everyone Honor Michael!!”

She also wrote:

“I wish to thank everyone who participated in the @M4tribute THANK U @JLSOfficial Yes Christina was Great @TheRealXtina also @leonalewismusic”

There was much excitement about the tribute to the King of Pop, and fans had been waiting to see a tribute for the star finally come to fruition. Christina Aguilera performed two songs, and the other artists sang many of Michael Jackson’s most beloved songs as well.

Source: Examiner.com

Witness: Dr. Murray Experimented on MJ

Posted on: 14th October 2011

Sleep expert Dr. Nadar Kamangar who called Dr. Conrad Murray’s treatment of Michael Jackson “inconceivable” told prosecutors today Murray used MJ as his own personal guinea pig for dangerous medical experiments.

Kamangar, an adviser for the CA Medical Board, testified that Propofol was never approved for use as a sleep aid when Murray used it to treat MJ’s insomnia.. claiming Murray’s treatment amounted to “an experiment.”

Murray’s attorney J. Michael Flanagan cited a Taiwan research study today from 2010, in which 64 patients with insomnia were successfully treated with Propofol but Kamangar pointed out the study did not exist in 2009 and took place after MJ’s death, in a safe hospital setting.

Doctor Testifies That Drug ‘Cocktail’ Administered by Murray Killed Michael Jackson

Posted on: 13th October 2011

Dr. Conrad Murray’s use of a cocktail of drugs on Michael Jackson as he struggled to fall asleep on the day he died was a “recipe for disaster” and ultimately caused his death, a UCLA sleep therapy expert testified Thursday.

Dr. Nader Kamanger described Murray’s treatment as “unethical, disturbing and beyond comprehension.”

Under questioning by Murray’s attorney, J. Michael Flanagan, the witness was asked to tell jurors what he knew about the events of June 25, 2009, the day of Jackson’s death.

“To summarize, Mr. Jackson was receiving very inappropriate therapy in a home setting, receiving very potent therapies without monitoring,”

Kamanger said.

He said diazepam (Valium), lorazepam (Ativan) and midazolam (Versed) were given to the sleepless star during a 10-hour period throughout the night and morning.

“This cocktail was a recipe for disaster,”

Kamanger said.

Noting the addition of propofol (Dipravan), a powerful anesthetic used in surgeries, Flanagan asked:

“Could this have caused death?’

“Absolutely,”

Kamanger said.

“Absolutely.”

Authorities say Murray gave Jackson a fatal dose of propofol. Murray has pleaded not guilty to involuntary manslaughter.

The witness, one of the experts who evaluated Murray’s actions for the California Medical Board, expressed dismay about the drugs Murray gave the pop star, his failure to immediately call 911 for help, and his lack of monitoring and record-keeping.

Murray was unable to produce any written records on his treatment of Jackson, Kamanger noted.

“There were no records whatsoever,”

he said.

“It’s very easy to forget details. We do not rely on memory.”

“So it’s your opinion that there’s no way he could have remembered what he did if he didn’t write it down?”

Flanagan asked.

“It is an egregious violation of the standard of care when you are using sedatives like propofol and you are not writing it down,”

Kamanger answered.

The defence lawyer pressed on, asking,

“Because he didn’t write down the pulse rate, oxygen saturation, heart rate … that didn’t kill Michael Jackson, did it?’

“It’s a combination of factors,”

said Kamanger.

“But not the cause of death?”

asked Flanagan.

“It’s a contributing factor,”

said the witness.

Kamanger was the third prosecution expert to criticize the conduct of Murray. He said his first mistake was using propofol to treat insomnia, calling it an unacceptable application of the drug.

He said Jackson’s demand for the drug — the subject of previous testimony — was not a sufficient reason to give it. He also suggested Murray should have done a physical examination, taken a history from his patient about his insomnia, and called in other medical experts if necessary to evaluate the problem.

“The most important thing he should have done is call for help,”

Kamanger said.

He said Murray’s interview with police made it clear that he waited too long to call 911 when he found Jackson not breathing.

Flanagan suggested at one point that doctors sometimes practice “bad medicine,” but their patients are unharmed. Kamanger agreed.

On redirect questioning, Deputy District Attorney David Walgren asked:

“Mr. Flanagan asked if a doctor could be grossly negligent and the patient could survive?”

“Yes,”

said Kamanger.

“Conrad Murray was grossly negligent in many areas and he caused Michael Jackson’s death, is that correct?”

“Yes,”

said the witness.

On Wednesday, Murray’s defence team announced they were dropping a claim that was the centerpiece of their case — that Jackson swallowed additional propofol when Murray was out of the room. Flanagan did not bring up self-dosing on Thursday.

Before court recessed, the prosecution called to the stand Dr. Steven Shafer, one of the nation’s leading experts on propofol. However, he did not get into his substantive testimony before trial recessed until Monday because Shafer had a schedule conflict.

Shafer was expected to be the final prosecution witness in the case. The defence has a colleague of Shafer’s waiting to take the stand.

Shafer helped craft guidelines for appropriate propofol dosing for sedation that is included in the packaging of every bottle that is sold.

Murray could face up to four years behind bars and the loss of his medical license if convicted.

Source: winnipegfreepress.com

Michael Jackson Trial: Conrad Murray Accused Of Practising ‘Bad Medicine’

Posted on: 13th October 2011

Sleep expert Dr Nader Kamangar has described Dr Conrad Murray’s failure to keep medical records on the night Michael Jackson died as “bad medicine”.

Dr Murray, on trial for the involuntary manslaughter of Jackson, should have never given the pop star propofol as a sleep aid, said Dr Nader Kamanger, a sleep expert called by prosecutors to discuss the singer’s insomnia.

“Mr Jackson was receiving very inappropriate therapy in the home setting, receiving very potent sedatives including propofol, midazolam and lorazepam, without appropriate monitoring and, and by Dr Murray, and ultimately this cocktail was a recipe for disaster,”

Dr Kamanger said.

Dr Kamanger said Dr Murray’s decision not to document the drugs he was giving the pop star as per medical norms, along with his admission that he did not call the emergency services for at least 20 minutes and his ineffectual resuscitation efforts, left Jackson with little chance for survival.

The evidence comes the day after the case for Conrad Murray’s defence shifted as his lawyers stunned the judge and prosecutors by saying they was abandoning the theory that Jackson self-administered fatal dose of the anaesthetic propofol orally.

Dr Murray has pleaded not guilty, his attorneys having repeatedly told jurors that they would show Jackson gave himself either the anaesthetic or the sedative lorazepam without the knowledge of his physician.

Source: Telegraph.co.uk

Family: Conrad Lied, Snubbed MJ’s Kids in ER

Posted on: 13th October 2011

In total contrast to what Dr. Conrad Murray told investigators in a taped statement to the LAPD, Michael Jackson’s son, Prince, says the cardiologist didn’t comfort him or his siblings at all in the moments after their father died.

In an exclusive report, Prince Jackson told his family that Murray’s account played in his involuntary manslaughter trial this week was not true, Trent Jackson, the nephew of Katherine and Joe Jackson, said Thursday.

Jackson family members were upset that jurors may sympathize with Murray because of perceived compassion for the children that day, Jackson told CNN.

Trent Jackson, who drove Katherine Jackson to Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, where doctors were trying to revive her son, said Murray did not have a conversation with Paris Jackson, the 12-year-old daughter, as he told police.

During that Dr. Murray goes on at length about the emotional exchanges he had with Jackson’s three children.

Jurors listened on Tuesday as Dr. Murray was heard on that tape telling detectives how Paris Jackson said to him,

“I know you tried your best, but I’m really sad. You know, I will wake up in the morning, and I won’t be able to see my daddy.’”

Duke also reports that according to Trent Jackson, Dr. Murray never spoke with Michael’s mother Katherine at the hospital, which is also contrary to what he told police.

Source: CNN.com

The Reason Michael Jackson’s Autopsy Photo Was Shown To Jurors

Posted on: 13th October 2011

The autopsy photo of Michael Jackson that was shown in court on Tuesday at Dr. Conrad Murray’s involuntary manslaughter trial evoked tears and gasps from audience members in attendance, and RadarOnline.com has exclusively learned why it was used.

“The defense has witnesses that are going to testify that Michael Jackson’s bones were protruding, and that he looked very, very sick. Remember the paramedic told jurors that when they first arrived at Michael Jackson’s bedroom, they thought he was a hospice patient. The photo had to be shown to jurors to show Michael Jackson’s physical state. The Jackson family was warned before the photo was shown, and Katherine Jackson left without seeing the photo,”

a law enforcement source tells RadarOnline.com.

RadarOnline.com has chosen not to publish Michael Jackson’s autopsy photograph.

“Showing an autopsy photo is never taken lightly. It can be gruesome, but there is always a very specific reason why it’s shown. This wasn’t done for shock value, as some pundits have declared,”

the insider says.

As the D.A. is expected to rest their case this week; the defense will then begin presenting its case.

If convicted of involuntary manslaughter, Dr. Murray could face up to four years behind bars.

Source: RadarOnline.com

With Final Witnesses, Prosecutors Focusing On ‘Gross Negligence’ of Michael Jackson Doctor

Posted on: 13th October 2011

Experts repeatedly told jurors that Michael Jackson’s doctor acted with “gross negligence” throughout his treatment of the pop superstar, a theme that will likely be repeated as prosecutors near the end of their involuntary manslaughter case against the physician.

The conclusion of the prosecution’s case, which may come on Thursday but more likely will extend into next week, brings defense attorneys a step closer to revealing how they will counter damaging evidence presented through more than 30 witnesses so far. The defense case shifted Wednesday when an attorney for Dr. Conrad Murray revealed he was abandoning the theory that Jackson swallowed the fatal dose of the anesthetic propofol.

The Houston-based cardiologist has pleaded not guilty, and his attorneys have repeatedly told jurors they will show Jackson self-administered either the anesthetic or the sedative lorazepam without Murray’s knowledge. They had invested months before the trial on the theory that Jackson somehow drank propofol and caused his own death.

Defense attorney J. Michael Flanagan stunned a judge and prosecutors before testimony resumed Wednesday that the results of a study he commissioned confirmed that if Jackson swallowed the anesthetic, its effects would be “trivial” and the issue wouldn’t be raised with jurors.

Murray’s attorneys may still argue that Jackson gave himself the fatal dose of the drugs, but a pair of experts told jurors that even if that happened, it didn’t change that Murray went far astray from medical norms.

The experts, a cardiologist and a sleep expert who both practice emergency medicine, said Murray should have never been giving Jackson propofol as a sleep aid.

“It’s beyond a departure from the standard of care into something unfathomable,”

said, Dr. Nader Kamanger, a UCLA sleep expert.

Kamanger said that even if Jackson did somehow give himself the fatal dose of a drug, Murray would still be at fault.

“Here you have a patient that may potentially have a substance abuse problem,”

Kamanger said.

“It sounds like he had a substance abuse problem,”

the doctor said, noting that Murray left the singer alone in his bedroom on June 25, 2009 with a variety of drugs readily available.

Jackson’s death, he said, was “a foreseeable complication.”

Both Kamanger and Dr. Alon Steinberg, a cardiologist, said Murray’s admission that he didn’t call 911 for at least 20 minutes and his ineffectual resuscitation efforts left Jackson with little chance for survival.

“Every minute counts,”

Steinberg said, adding that even a five-minute delay in calling could be the difference between life and death. He called Murray’s behavior “strange” and along with Kamanger criticized the cardiologist for trying to perform CPR on Jackson’s bed rather than a hard surface.

Kamanger and Steinberg each listed multiple reasons for why they felt Murray acted with “gross negligence” while acting as Jackson’s personal physician as the singer prepared for a series of comeback concerts in 2009. Steinberg noted that Murray lacked sophisticated medical equipment that is present in hospital settings where propofol is supposed to be administered.

Kamanger said there was no evidence that Murray attempted to diagnose the underlying reasons why Jackson couldn’t sleep and was giving the singer sedatives that were addictive.

Kamanger will undergo cross-examination when court resumes on Thursday. Prosecutors are expected to conclude their portion of the case by calling anesthesiology professor and researcher Dr. Steven Shafer, who is a leading expert on propofol.

Defense attorneys will likely call several witnesses and are relying on another anesthesiologist, Dr. Paul White, to try to counter the prosecution experts. White sat in the courtroom Wednesday, occasionally conferring with Flanagan and Murray’s other defense attorneys.

The cardiologist faces up to four years behind bars and the loss of his medical license if convicted.

Source: WashingtonPost.com

Jackson Fans Immersed In Doctor’s Manslaughter Trial

Posted on: 13th October 2011

Every day is a lottery at the trial of Conrad Murray, Michael Jackson’s doctor, who stands accused of killing perhaps the world’s most famous singer.
Jackson fans line up against the courtroom wall at 07:30 every morning in the hope of winning a draw for one of the few seats in the public gallery.

Like millions of others across America and the world they could watch it on the internet or on TV, but there is obviously something more to be gained from being there in person, sitting just a few feet from the lawyers, the family and the accused.

I joined the draw two days in a row – second-time lucky – to get a feel for the courtroom and to immerse myself in a trial that has been creating a buzz across America.

It was an interesting day to sit in on the trial.

It was a day which began with what the TV pundits called a “cornerstone of the defence” being pulled away, and went on to hear some damning accusations of “gross negligence” against the man whom Michael Jackson trusted as his doctor.

Before proceedings even began, before the 16 men and women of the jury had been buzzed into their seats, the defence had conceded Michael Jackson could not have drunk the drug which killed him.

Propofol is what it the trial all about.

It is is an extremely strong sedative and Michael Jackson was having his doctor use it to help him get to sleep.

It was a combination of that and a number of other sedatives which caused his death – and as the man prescribing the pills, injections and intravenous drugs, Conrad Murray stands accused of causing his death by involuntary manslaughter.

One key line of defence is that Michael Jackson took the drugs himself, when his doctor was not looking.

A presumption made by the countless commentators, TV experts, ex-prosecutors and journalists was that Michael Jackson drank the drug. But research by both the prosecution and the defence proved it was only effective if injected straight into the blood.

And so a line of questioning defence lawyers may have used, and indeed hinted they would use, was dropped – but not the theory of self-medication altogether.

Jackson could have injected himself, or taken other pills, but that is for another day of evidence or for when the defence case begins.

But this day was all about independent medical experts and their professional opinion of Dr Murray. They were not impressed.

For much of the day cardiologist Dr Alon Steinberg was in the stand, describing how he had reviewed Dr Murray’s own account of what happened the night Michael Jackson died, as told to a detective.

He outlined six separate instances of what he called “gross negligence.”

“Propofol should never be given as a sleeping drug,”

was his premise, explaining it was a strong sedative used as an anaesthetic in surgical operations and its use in this way was negligent and unethical.

Once given the drug, Michael Jackson should have been monitored properly, all the time, with heart and blood pressure monitors, back-up drugs and equipment in case anything went wrong.

And perhaps most damning of all, he said the way Conrad Murray reacted when Jackson stopped breathing was “responsible for the singer’s death”.

By not immediately calling the emergency services, taking the wrong action in those vital few minutes and not having prepared for an emergency, he had made “a direct contribution to Michael Jackson’s death”, Dr Steinberg told the court.

The second witness, Professor Nader Kamangar, was equally critical of the use of such a powerful sedative which he said required proper training and was usually given in a hospital or clinical environment, not in someone’s home.

He also reviewed Conrad Murray’s account of what happened, and as a sleep medicine expert stressed propofol should not be used for insomnia.

The two independent witnesses helped build up a strong picture of a poor doctor who did not follow basic procedure and was negligent.

It is a picture the defence will be keen to undermine in the cross-examination of Prof Kamangar, with the prosecution continuing to build its case against Conrad Murray as the trial approaches its half-way mark.

Meanwhile the Jackson fans will keep on arriving for the daily lottery, to secure one of those precious seats in the courtroom.

Source: BBC.co.uk